Teacher Evaluation System

 

Cape May City School District’s Teacher Evaluation System, SY 2009-2010

Introduction

As part of the federal requirements for states’ receiving funding under Phase 2 of the State Fiscal Stabilization Funds Program, all school districts in New Jersey are providing information to the public on the procedures they use to evaluate teachers and principals.  The information presented below will help you understand Cape May City School District’s policies and procedures for evaluating teachers and educational specialists such as librarians and counselors.

 

Confidentiality concerns:  To protect the confidentiality of individual evaluations, districts are not required to provide a district-level statistical summary of teacher evaluation outcomes in those cases where there are fewer than 10 teachers in an entire district.  Similarly, districts are not required to provide a school-level statistical summary of teacher evaluation outcomes if there are fewer than 10 teachers in a school.


Section 1.  Description of Teacher Evaluation System


Purpose:
  The Cape May City Board of Education believes that effective evaluation of teaching staff is essential to the achievement of the educational goals of this district, including student achievement of the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards.  The purpose of evaluations shall be to promote professional excellence and improve the skills of teaching staff members; improve pupil learning and growth; and provide a basis for the review of staff performance.

 

 


Procedures:
  All full time and part time contracted teachers are evaluated using an approved evaluation tool which consists of a checklist in five areas: Curriculum, Student Growth, Preparation and Readiness, Instructional Performance, and Interaction and Climate.  The evaluation also includes a Narrative, Suggestions, Commendations, and Teacher’s Comments.

Each observation of a teaching staff member is conducted for a minimum duration of one class period for one complete subject lesson as required for an elementary school.  Each observation is followed, within eight days, by a conference between the supervisory staff member who made the observation and written evaluation and the teacher.

 

An Annual Performance Report is also created by the administrator including a self-evaluation by the teacher at a yearly conference.  The teacher’s annual Professional Improvement Plan (PIP) is also evaluated for completion of goals.  A PIP for the following year is reviewed by the teacher and administrator and approved by the administrator.

 

If necessary, a Professional Action Plan may be developed to help strengthen the teacher’s skills in one of the five checklist areas referred to above.  

 


Evidence:
  the formal teacher evaluation process includes the following evidence:  formal observation, teacher work portfolio, walk-through observations, pre and/or post observations conferences, teacher work samples (e.g., lesson plans; assignments), teacher’s Professional Development Plan, progress in completing required professional development hours, teacher self-evaluation, and an evaluator narrative.

 


How results are used from our teacher evaluation system
:   to plan professional development opportunities; to inform a teacher’s Professional Development Plan; to inform tenure decisions; to inform compensation decisions; to inform recommendations for continued employment; to inform selection of teachers for specific roles or duties; to inform teacher placement decisions; and to inform decisions on teachers awards and recognitions.

 

 


Conceptual framework that guides the design of this process:
  In addition to the importance of communication, commitment, and collaboration, the following conceptual frameworks guide the design of the evaluation process:  to relate the overall teacher evaluation system and individual performance roles to goals of the organization; to consider the context of teacher evaluation; to base teacher evaluation on clearly defined job duties; to use multiple sources of evidence to document teacher performance; to design and use a performance assessment to make fair judgments in teacher evaluation; and that the overall teacher evaluation system should facilitate professional growth and improved performance. The conceptual frameworks are based on NJ Professional Standards for Teachers, Robert Marzano’s Nine Essential Instructional Strategies, and Stronge & Tucker’s Goals and Roles (G&R) Evaluation Model

 

 


How the process fits into the role of human capital management in our district:
 the purpose of all professional development is to increase student achievement.  NCLB goals, District Goals, and Professional Development Plan goals are integrated.  Professional Development funds focus on these identified and integrated goals so that the funds are used in a cost-effective manner.

 

 

How the Teacher Evaluation System relates to our District’s mission and values:  Our
District’s Mission Statement is “to teach the NJ Core Curriculum Standards to achieve excellence in partnership with family and community.”  The teacher evaluations are related to the District’s goals to increase communication with the families and community through technology and numerous school involvement activities.  

 


Tenured/non tenured differences

a.     The district board of education has adopted policies and procedures for the annual evaluation of all tenured teaching staff members by appropriately certified personnel. The policies are distributed to all tenured teaching staff members by October 1. (N.J.A.C. 6A:32-4.4) The annual written performance report is prepared by the certified supervisor who has participated in the evaluation of the tenured teaching staff member and includes an individual Professional Development Plan (former PIP) developed by the supervisor and the teaching staff member.

 

b.    Tenured teaching staff members shall be observed and evaluated at least once each year plus as annual summative performance report.

 

 

c.     The district has adopted policy for the supervision of instruction for all non-tenured teaching staff members and the policy is distributed to each teaching staff member at the beginning of his or her employment. (N.J.A.C. 6A:32-4.5) The annual written performance report is prepared by the certified supervisor who has participated in the evaluation of the tenured teaching staff member and includes an individual Professional Development Plan (former PIP) developed by the supervisor and the teaching staff member.

 

d.    Non-tenured teaching staff members shall be observed and evaluated at least three times a year plus an annual summative performance report.

 


Cape May
City School District: Teacher Evaluation Results

SY 2009-2010

 

Number of teachers meeting the district’s criteria for acceptable performance

Number of teachers in the Cape May City School District

Percent of teachers in district meeting these criteria

       21

                21

                   100%

 

 

 



Cape May
City Elementary School:  Teacher Evaluation Results

SY 2009-2010

 

Number of teachers meeting the district’s criteria for acceptable performance

Number of teachers in the Cape May City Elementary School

Percent of teachers in the school meeting these criteria

       21

                21

                  100%

 

 



Other information for the public to understand:


   
The Cape May City School District is a one-school district meaning it has one school—the Cape May City Elementary School.  Therefore, district and school information is the same.

     The Cape May City School District has a Chief School Administrator who is evaluated as a Superintendent and not as a principal.  To protect confidentiality reasons, schools having less than 10 teachers or 10 principals are not posted.